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AUD to ZAR Exchange Rate

Today's Rate
The rate displayed below is based on 1 AUD.
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Code ZAR
Symbol Rs
R1, R2, R5, 5c, 10c, 20c
R10, R20, R50, R100, R200

Take a walk on the wild side

It’s hard to think of a place where this much history meets this much nature, but South Africa has it covered. Have you ever met an elephant? Or seen the unbelievable architecture of Stellenbosch? Maybe you’re a fan of heights and would prefer the staggering views from the Blyde River Canyon. Or perhaps you’d get your thrills from the river rapids below. Whether you’ve been to South Africa before or not, we can guarantee there’s still plenty left to see and do.

However, all of these sights and activities are out of reach unless you have some South African rand by your side. The local currency is your ticket to exotic dining in Cape Town, safari tours in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, and plenty of other adventures. Swap your Aussie dollars for some South African rand; with this in hand, the land is yours to explore.

Historical Chart

AUD (Australian dollar) - Australia
today's rate
1 AUD = ZAR on Cash
1 AUD = ZAR on Travel Money Card

The rates chart gives you a breakdown of how these two currencies have compared historically. Want more rands in your hand? Sign up for currency alerts. When the exchange rate is right where you want it, you’ll receive a notification.

Coins and notes

Coins in South Africa are worth 5c, 10c and 20c, R1, R2 and R5 a piece. Notes range through R10, R20, R50, R100 and R200. So whether you’re in a fancy restaurant or lining up for the river rapids, there’s a note or coin to come in ‘rand’y.

Facts about the currency

  • As much fun as South Africa is, there are restrictions on carrying cash into the nation. If you have any more than 25,000 ZAR or US$10,000 (or any other equivalent across currencies), you’ll need to declare it upon entry.
  • Paper currency was used in South Africa back in the 17th Century, when the Rixdollar was in circulation.
  • South Africa was a common trading point for the world during this time, so there was never a shortage of foreign currencies in circulation.
  • The British tried to make South Africa run on the pound sterling back in 1826, but it didn’t really take – people just traded in Spanish dollars, US dollars, French francs, Indian rupees, or whatever they could get their hands on really.
  • Finally, the pound was pounded in 1961, and the rand was introduced.